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How Long Does a Set of Dentures Last?

One of the most common questions people have about dentures is whether they will stand the test of time.  Dentures are certainly effective replacement teeth yet they will not last forever. For the most part, dentists agree dentures will last between 5-10 years.  Once your dentures reach about a decade in age, they will need replacement or repairs.

So...

How Long can Dentures Last?

Dentures can last upwards of 30 years yet there is no guarantee they will function or look as they should by that point in time.  If you get a decade or longer out of your dentures, you should be happy. In order to maximize denture longevity, focus on maintaining the proper level of oral hygiene. Clean your dentures every single night and visit the dentist at least twice a year. In some cases, denture revisions are necessary to ensure the proper fit and function.  It is also possible for the contour of the gum line to change and spur the need for revisions.  This actually happens fairly regularly, so do not panic if minor revisions are necessary as you age.  In some cases, dentures will not require replacement after failure. Your dentist might be able to re-base or re-line the dentures to avoid expensive replacement costs. If your dentures do not feel comfortable, contact your dentist to make the appropriate alterations.  Loose dentures are more than a nuisance. They also present a choking hazard to boot. This is precisely why those who wear dentures should visit with their dentist at least every six months.

It is Possible for Dentures to be a Permanent Solution

In some cases, dentures will serve as a permanent solution for tooth loss.  If the patient is in the later stages of life, the dentures might last. So do not assume you will have to replace your dentures.   Take good care of these artificial teeth and they just might prove functional well into your golden years until you become an octogenarian and maybe even last until you achieve centenarian status.

Dentures Should be Checked With Regularity to Prolong Longevity

Dentures will show some signs of wear and tear as time progresses.  This is true of dentures that receive proper care as well as neglected dentures. Every denture-wearer should visit with the dentist several times per year. The dentist will check the dentures' condition, analyze the gums to determine if there is any shrinking and will then make whatever adjustments or re-linings are necessary. If the gums shrink, the dentures will eventually loosen to the point that they move.  Your dentist's assistance will prevent this outcome and prolong your dentures' longevity.  So be sure to have your dentures examined by your oral health care expert at least a couple times per year.

Here's the answer:

If your dentures are even slightly worn or do not fit properly, they have the potential to cause infections, sores and even worse problems.  If these issues are significant, your dentist will let you know that the issues compromise your dentures' integrity and that repairs/replacement are necessary.  For the most part, dentists agree that dentures function at their best across the first seven years. If your focus is optimal functionality and a firm seal, go ahead and replace your dentures every seven years or so. For more denture information or to schedule an appointment with Arbours Aesthetic Dentistry, request an appointment in our Rancho Santa Margarita dental office here: https://www.arboursdentistry.com. Or call us at (949) 709-1900.

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